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Thread: New Pink Floyd Book Explores Journey to DSOTM

  1. #71
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    Sigh.

    Like a lot of Pink Floyd history, this book is both great and frustrating. You have to accept the book for what it is, a companion to the boxed set. If you are not a hard core Pink Floyd fan (like us) and you managed to get ahold of The Early Years, I'll bet it was a confusing experience. What is this music? Unlike other boxed sets, this one offers only minimal information to put it into perspective. This book is an attempt to fix that issue.

    Yes, there are factual errors and these are disappointing but I know of no other resource that makes any attempt to explain this era in detail. I commend Kopp for even attempting to do this. I'm sure it was a significant challenge.

    As for those who think it is too expensive, I have one word for you. Wah. Books are expensive these days, across the board. Get a Kindle or wait for it to come out on paperback or find a library that has a copy. Or don't read it, I don't care. The price is what it is.
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  2. #72
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    Just finished reading this book and it has some glaring mistakes (and I’m not really a “date” guy myself), it also pushes ludicrous ideas based off the foggy memories of a thirteen year old in 1970 that Jude Waters would’ve screamed during “Careful With That Axe, Eugene” instead of Roger in New Orleans in 1970.

    Aside from the mistakes, the book does turn out to be a pretty good companion to the Early Years box set. It’s actually a note-by-note guidebook to the earlier works and I enjoyed some of those remarks. I don’t think anyone here will learn anything new. Research-wise it feels a little poor (I think there are 2 mentions of “If” coming off Ummagumma in the book), the factual parts shed no new light and is essentially a rehash of previous research.

    I did enjoy Bill’s personal takes on the albums and the Early Years though, was nice to revisit studio albums!
    --
    Regards,
    PL

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