Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: The other two videos from Pink Floyd Live at Hyde Park 1970

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    North west England
    Posts
    134
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default The other two videos from Pink Floyd Live at Hyde Park 1970

    Pink Floyd live at Hyde Park 1970


    I didn’t know the other two tracks where filmed two.
    Is this all the work of John Hoppy Hopkins.
    Here the other two anyway.
    Pink Floyd aficionados please tell me more.

    Set the controls for the heart of sun
    https://youtu.be/0idYhJta7Uk

    Embryo
    https://youtu.be/mroNOVjDAAI

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,746
    Thanks
    476
    Thanked 28,432 Times in 355 Posts

    Default

    I started discussing Hyde Park with John ‘Hoppy’ Hopkins in the spring of 2004. He explained that he had 2 reels of monochrome, mono sound, half inch videotape of the Floyd in the Park 1970 but had no machine to play them on, even if they were in a condition to play (the format being SonyCV2100, 625 lines).

    A discussion started about how I could assist with the transfer. Hoppy wished to negotiate but I was wary of spending a lot of money on something that could turn out to be nothing at a time when I had a newborn in the house. As Hoppy explained, we had to be prepared at best for a result that was technically mediocre because:
    (a) the signals decay over the years
    (b) they weren’t good quality or stability to start with.

    The obvious person to transfer the tapes was Lucy Reeve in Ealing. Lucy would use her type 2100 VTR to check playback on her premises. Hoppy assumed that the tapes did not need heat treatment in order to play as other ones in his collection had been OK in the past. The tapes (I’m assuming that they no longer exist or have been lost) were nominal 20mins each and Hoppy thought were recorded on the same VTR, so assumed that if one played OK so should the other.

    Hoppy planned to spool the tapes end to end in advance on another half-inch machine to relieve any remaining stress before passing the tapes to Lucy. Playback of ancient tapes is always a bit of a step in the dark because they may shed a lot of coating making it necessary to stop the machine and clean the heads. At the time Hoppy believed they had been untouched for at least 30 years. They had been in his possession all that time.

    Transfer was to be to VHS with burned in time code (BITC) at the initial transfer stage and I own this tape. I collected my VHS on 3 February 2006 and paid a very small amount of money to help cover Hoppy’s costs.

    Speaking to Hoppy over the phone after a debate started about the source with various collectors, he was very clear that the film was not made by Jack Moore. It was filmed by a German man employed by Hoppy's team - I forget his name. There were people filming on both sides of the stage and a big camera at the front of the stage in the centre. This seemingly much more sophisticated mounted camera with cameraman can be seen at one point in Hoppy’s film. The two cameramen in the rafters were not linked to the man in front of the stage. Hoppy borrowed the equipment for the film from Goldsmiths College. He was not present at the concert.

    In addition to my BITC VHS, Hoppy had the two tapes transferred to a single Betacam. This Betacam is likely to have been the direct or original source of the version of Atom Heart Mother that can be seen on The Early Years boxset.

    Of the transfers, about half is watchable and the other half has a lot of interference. The "good" footage has a more or less complete take of Atom Heart Mother.

    Hoppy sold a copy of the Betacam of Atom Heart Mother to documentary makers Endemol but they didn’t use it. His complete outlay on the transfer was about £200.

    I made a single rough copy of Hoppy’s VHS to DVD using rudimentary equipment which Hoppy then gave copies of to various fans. He was a generous man who always liked to help people whenever he could but also a shrewd businessman.

    Late on in Hoppy’s life various people put me under significant pressure to release a clean copy of the VHS here on Y. I wouldn’t relent because Hoppy was very clear that the film was his intellectual property. Hoppy contributed hugely to the Pink Floyd story and I believed that it was more important to honour his wishes than go for glory by sharing the film with everyone. As the years passed lots of people acquired copies of the DVD and excitement levels about it reached a crescendo. It was then let loose on the world.
    Last edited by neonknight; 2018-04-18 at 09:57 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    North west England
    Posts
    134
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neonknight View Post
    I started discussing Hyde Park with John ‘Hoppy’ Hopkins in the spring of 2004. He explained that he had 2 reels of monochrome, mono sound, half inch videotape of the Floyd in the Park 1970 but had no machine to play them on, even if they were in a condition to play (the format being SonyCV2100, 625 lines).

    A discussion started about how I could assist with the transfer. Hoppy wished to negotiate but I was wary of spending a lot of money on something that could turn out to be nothing at a time when I had a newborn in the house. As Hoppy explained, we had to be prepared at best for a result that was technically mediocre because:
    (a) the signals decay over the years
    (b) they weren’t good quality or stability to start with.

    The obvious person to transfer the tapes was Lucy Reeve in Ealing. Lucy would use her type 2100 VTR to check playback on her premises. Hoppy assumed that the tapes did not need heat treatment in order to play as other ones in his collection had been OK in the past. The tapes (I’m assuming that they no longer exist or have been lost) were nominal 20mins each and Hoppy thought were recorded on the same VTR, so assumed that if one played OK so should the other.

    Hoppy planned to spool the tapes end to end in advance on another half-inch machine to relieve any remaining stress before passing the tapes to Lucy. Playback of ancient tapes is always a bit of a step in the dark because they may shed a lot of coating making it necessary to stop the machine and clean the heads. At the time Hoppy believed they had been untouched for at least 30 years. They had been in his possession all that time.

    Transfer was to be to VHS with burned in time code (BITC) at the initial transfer stage and I own this tape. I collected my VHS on 3 February 2006 and paid a very small amount of money to help cover Hoppy’s costs.

    Speaking to Hoppy over the phone after a debate started about the source with various collectors, he was very clear that the film was not made by Jack Moore. It was filmed by a German man employed by Hoppy's team - I forget his name. There were people filming on both sides of the stage and a big camera at the front of the stage in the centre. This seemingly much more sophisticated mounted camera with cameraman can be seen at one point in Hoppy’s film. The two cameramen in the rafters were not linked to the man in front of the stage. Hoppy borrowed the equipment for the film from Goldsmiths College. He was not present at the concert.

    In addition to my BITC VHS, Hoppy had the two tapes transferred to a single Betacam. This Betacam is likely to have been the direct or original source of the version of Atom Heart Mother that can be seen on The Early Years boxset.

    Of the transfers, about half is watchable and the other half has a lot of interference. The "good" footage has a more or less complete take of Atom Heart Mother.

    Hoppy sold a copy of the Betacam of Atom Heart Mother to documentary makers Endemol but they didn’t use it. His complete outlay on the transfer was about £200.

    I made a single rough copy of Hoppy’s VHS to DVD using rudimentary equipment which Hoppy then gave copies of to various fans. He was a generous man who always liked to help people whenever he could but also a shrewd businessman.

    Late on in Hoppy’s life various people put me under significant pressure to release a clean copy of the VHS here on Y. I wouldn’t relent because Hoppy was very clear that the film was his intellectual property. Hoppy contributed hugely to the Pink Floyd story and I believed that it was more important to honour his wishes than go for glory by sharing the film with everyone. As the years passed lots of people acquired copies of the DVD and excitement levels about it reached a crescendo. It was then let loose on the world.

    Thanks for your reply my fellow Floyd aficionado.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    1,274
    Thanks
    94
    Thanked 818 Times in 20 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neonknight View Post
    I started discussing Hyde Park with John ‘Hoppy’ Hopkins in the spring of 2004. He explained that he had 2 reels of monochrome, mono sound, half inch videotape of the Floyd in the Park 1970 but had no machine to play them on, even if they were in a condition to play (the format being SonyCV2100, 625 lines).

    A discussion started about how I could assist with the transfer. Hoppy wished to negotiate but I was wary of spending a lot of money on something that could turn out to be nothing at a time when I had a newborn in the house. As Hoppy explained, we had to be prepared at best for a result that was technically mediocre because:
    (a) the signals decay over the years
    (b) they weren’t good quality or stability to start with.

    The obvious person to transfer the tapes was Lucy Reeve in Ealing. Lucy would use her type 2100 VTR to check playback on her premises. Hoppy assumed that the tapes did not need heat treatment in order to play as other ones in his collection had been OK in the past. The tapes (I’m assuming that they no longer exist or have been lost) were nominal 20mins each and Hoppy thought were recorded on the same VTR, so assumed that if one played OK so should the other.

    Hoppy planned to spool the tapes end to end in advance on another half-inch machine to relieve any remaining stress before passing the tapes to Lucy. Playback of ancient tapes is always a bit of a step in the dark because they may shed a lot of coating making it necessary to stop the machine and clean the heads. At the time Hoppy believed they had been untouched for at least 30 years. They had been in his possession all that time.

    Transfer was to be to VHS with burned in time code (BITC) at the initial transfer stage and I own this tape. I collected my VHS on 3 February 2006 and paid a very small amount of money to help cover Hoppy’s costs.

    Speaking to Hoppy over the phone after a debate started about the source with various collectors, he was very clear that the film was not made by Jack Moore. It was filmed by a German man employed by Hoppy's team - I forget his name. There were people filming on both sides of the stage and a big camera at the front of the stage in the centre. This seemingly much more sophisticated mounted camera with cameraman can be seen at one point in Hoppy’s film. The two cameramen in the rafters were not linked to the man in front of the stage. Hoppy borrowed the equipment for the film from Goldsmiths College. He was not present at the concert.

    In addition to my BITC VHS, Hoppy had the two tapes transferred to a single Betacam. This Betacam is likely to have been the direct or original source of the version of Atom Heart Mother that can be seen on The Early Years boxset.

    Of the transfers, about half is watchable and the other half has a lot of interference. The "good" footage has a more or less complete take of Atom Heart Mother.

    Hoppy sold a copy of the Betacam of Atom Heart Mother to documentary makers Endemol but they didn’t use it. His complete outlay on the transfer was about £200.

    I made a single rough copy of Hoppy’s VHS to DVD using rudimentary equipment which Hoppy then gave copies of to various fans. He was a generous man who always liked to help people whenever he could but also a shrewd businessman.

    Late on in Hoppy’s life various people put me under significant pressure to release a clean copy of the VHS here on Y. I wouldn’t relent because Hoppy was very clear that the film was his intellectual property. Hoppy contributed hugely to the Pink Floyd story and I believed that it was more important to honour his wishes than go for glory by sharing the film with everyone. As the years passed lots of people acquired copies of the DVD and excitement levels about it reached a crescendo. It was then let loose on the world.
    Thanks for the great story.

    A shame that all footage from all 3 cameras didn't survive. Would have made a great multicam

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •