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Thread: Storage to Stereo Receiver Question

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    Default Storage to Stereo Receiver Question

    I was fortunate a while back to have a great way to store music. I have Seagate Go Flex Home and all of my stuff is sent from that to my Onkyo receiver via an Ethernet. The Seagate Device is now almost full and I want to proactively upgrade to something new. The problem is that I don't know the latest technology (the Go Flex goes back about 7-8 years, maybe more). I know you can't really use a WD or Seagate external hard drive because there is no Ethernet connection on those, so what is the latest, most standard way to store your WAVs on a device that plugs directly into your receiver. If someone can give me a few product names or product category, that would be great. Any help would be appreciated.

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    Would this work? WD cloud storage. USB3.

    https://shop.westerndigital.com/prod...XC0020HWT-NESN

    Rick

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    NAS box and install whatever size drives you want/need.

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    Yep, NAS is definitely the way to go if you can afford it - they're not cheap. They're linux based computerised boxes without the keyboard or monitor especially designed for network file storage, and can be as complex or simply setup as you want.They come with all the networking software out of the box Their hard drives are designed to be adaptable and hot swappable as your needs change. You buy the NAS and hard drives for them separately.

    I've a 3 year old QNAP HS-251+ - a machine which was aimed at the home consumer market, so it's fanless and silent apart from the chirpping of the drives. Most NAS's have cooling fans built-in but they're all pretty quiet.

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    You can put storage in any computer and use a network switch or any basic home router to connect both computer and AV receiver to a private network.
    Or connect the AV receiver directly as an audio device with a thunderbolt to HDMI cable provided that 1. You have a computer at least 2010 or newer with thunderbolt and 2. your AV receiver has a full HDMI input. (They sell them with audio disabled and video input only on some models. Watch out for that crap when shopping!)

    I'd recommend WD hard drives over Seagate. I honestly think ALL hard drives are more robust than in the past but I'd stiii avoid Seagate.
    WD Black are made to run 24/7 and include a 5 year warranty. They're about double the price for that. (A 4TB is $180) Maybe overkill for just home theater serving.

    Buy your hard drives in pairs. Primary/backup. Clone primary to backup on a regular schedule.
    (It's not IF a drive will fail. It's WHEN.)
    You could be frugal by spending on WD Black drives to connect internally on SATA but then buy USB externals for the backup drives. The backup drives don't have to have high performance.

    If you want to go to a full blown NAS system with a dedicated backup system (scheduled clones and drives allotted to backups)... killer!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimfisheye View Post
    I'd recommend WD hard drives over Seagate. I honestly think ALL hard drives are more robust than in the past but I'd stiii avoid Seagate.
    My experience agrees with yours. I know all drives will fail eventually, but I've had several Seagate drives fail and none of the WD drives fail so far. I do have my suspicions about the state of one or two of my older external WD drives, but they are old enough (and thus low capacity enough) for me to have retired them from regular use. In contrast, the Seagate drives that failed did so in what was still reasonably their active lifetime.

    I'd hope Seagate have improved, but I had such a bad run with them I'm not bothering. I did buy a couple of Toshiba external drives that have survived OK, to my surprise (they were quite cheap).

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    Wow, didn't realize I had so many responses. I have some questions for you all. Thanks so much for the info.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick0725 View Post
    Would this work? WD cloud storage. USB3.

    https://shop.westerndigital.com/prod...XC0020HWT-NESN

    Rick
    Rick, I think this is what I have currently, but it is older and only 1TB. What initiated all of this was that I now have over 1TB and need to upgrade. Is the link you sent essentially an updated version this kind of set up:

    https://www.seagate.com/support/exte...e/goflex-home/
    Last edited by demamo; 2020-07-18 at 05:08 AM. Reason: Made sentence clearer

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimfisheye View Post
    You can put storage in any computer and use a network switch or any basic home router to connect both computer and AV receiver to a private network.
    Or connect the AV receiver directly as an audio device with a thunderbolt to HDMI cable provided that 1. You have a computer at least 2010 or newer with thunderbolt and 2. your AV receiver has a full HDMI input. (They sell them with audio disabled and video input only on some models. Watch out for that crap when shopping!)

    Jim, I have a MAC and an Onkyo 646 that only uses Fat 32 and Fat 16. I have not been able to hook up my WD Passport because the MAC formatting won't work on the Onkyo. So I think the first option is out. The second method you mention may work but my MAC and Onkyo are pretty far apart. Hmmm

    I'd recommend WD hard drives over Seagate. I honestly think ALL hard drives are more robust than in the past but I'd stiii avoid Seagate.
    WD Black are made to run 24/7 and include a 5 year warranty. They're about double the price for that. (A 4TB is $180) Maybe overkill for just home theater serving.

    Buy your hard drives in pairs. Primary/backup. Clone primary to backup on a regular schedule.
    (It's not IF a drive will fail. It's WHEN.)
    You could be frugal by spending on WD Black drives to connect internally on SATA but then buy USB externals for the backup drives. The backup drives don't have to have high performance.

    If you want to go to a full blown NAS system with a dedicated backup system (scheduled clones and drives allotted to backups)... killer!
    Regarding the NAS system...see my other respond to Arnold_Layne.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by demamo; 2020-07-18 at 05:07 AM. Reason: Made the sentence more precise

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arnold_Layne View Post
    NAS box and install whatever size drives you want/need.
    Can you send me a link to a NAS box so I can get an idea of what you, TJ Mack and Jimfisheye are referring to?? All three - feel free to chime in. Thanks again!

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