Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Archiving torrents

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 44 Times in 1 Post

    Default Archiving torrents

    Hi all,
    I'd like your opinion on how to best archive torrents.

    As far as I understand, once downloaded they must not be altered if I want to keep seeding them or have them handy for reseed requests. But at least speaking for myself, I tend to rename folders and files so that they don't contain spaces, convert shn to flac, add/edit metadata.

    This all comes down to the need that I find myself duplicating the data and keeping notes that show the cross-reference. I'm aware that disk space gets cheaper and cheaper and that it's more a case of keeping things organized.

    How do you guys handle that? Are there any tools out there that make things easier?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    355
    Thanks
    210
    Thanked 49 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    I'm probably not a representative sample because I'm not so concerned about some arbitrary "purity" of the trading pool that I prioritise changing absolutely nothing. The only thing I concern myself with is keeping the decompressed audio data intact and the info intact.

    I used to like to rename things and add metadata, but somewhere along the way I lost the energy to do that. I think because there is still so much material to download and listen to, that I rarely listen to anything more than once. So why bother with metadata?

    What I do instead of renaming is simply create a container directory with my preferred naming structure, and move the entire downloaded directory inside it. Every media player I use can recursively search through directory trees for audio files, so adding another directory level is no inconvenience and leaves the original directory name intact. Not that the top level directory is that important. File names I don't bother with, but I can see why some people may want either more descriptive file names or metadata.

    What I also do is convert .shn to FLAC because .shn is such a tedious and antiquated format to deal with. The only thing going for it is that is it a lossless format, which means you can convert it to something more convenient (FLAC) without losing anything. I do tend to keep the original torrents or archive files on a backup drive. As I posted on another forum, you want to keep redundant copies of everything in your media collection because physical media does fail.

    Since I don't alter much, I don't have any particularly useful tools to recommend. I do my .shn -> .flac conversion via the command line, because that's actually more convenient for me. And creating top-level directories you can use your favourite OS file manager.


    So, since you wanted an opinion, that was one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 44 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Thanks. Creating a individually named super-folder might be an option.

    I now also remember Beechwoods mentioning m-tags (http://yeeshkul.com/forum/showthread...ags#post285634) for stand-off tagging, but that it has little player support.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    107
    Thanked 501 Times in 15 Posts

    Default

    Considering that it is wise to keep at least two copies of anything digital, I keep the first downloaded copy in its' downloaded form on one external drive, and make a second copy on a separate drive, which I then rename (usually just the folder name) and conform to the conventions of my personal naming system. Generally all the contents of the folder stay the same, or if some supplemental info is needed I will make a new text file which I could easily omit from a reseed.
    Floyd First Since 1978

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    355
    Thanks
    210
    Thanked 49 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Swirling Panpot View Post
    Generally all the contents of the folder stay the same, or if some supplemental info is needed I will make a new text file which I could easily omit from a reseed.
    Yeah, good point. I having a naming convention where I add extra info to a _MoreInfo.txt file. Though again I'm not so concerned about "purity" that I won't make corrections to a wrong or missing set list. I think it's fine to improve the trading pool.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    107
    Thanked 501 Times in 15 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by snagu View Post
    Yeah, good point. I having a naming convention where I add extra info to a _MoreInfo.txt file. Though again I'm not so concerned about "purity" that I won't make corrections to a wrong or missing set list. I think it's fine to improve the trading pool.
    Just understand that if you change any of the original files they will not seed properly, so therefore you will not effectively be improving the trading pool unless you post a new thread with the revisions. Alternately you could reseed as it was downloaded and include your improvement notes in the thread as comments, but not within the downloaded material. I often will read down through a thread looking for such information, which could then be pasted into a _MoreInfo.txt file on my drives.
    Floyd First Since 1978

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    355
    Thanks
    210
    Thanked 49 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Sure, I understand that. I just don't see the point of "preserving" obviously faulty information. Far better to create a new torrent. For other sites that expire inactive torrents, you're going to be creating a new torrent in the future when it's time to re-seed anyway. And provided you don't add metadata to the audio files, anyone joining in to help you seed will be able to contribute 99% or so of the content anyway, so it's not a big deal to correct misinformation for the benefit of the future audience.

    To be clear, I don't modify even the info while I'm still helping seed an active torrent. This is all about when it gets posted the next time around. Particularly on other sites that don't specialise around one band where everyone knows all the set lists. And on those sites you do get torrents where the poster has no idea of the actual setlist, and others more familiar can help out.
    Last edited by snagu; 2021-04-29 at 11:51 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    107
    Thanked 501 Times in 15 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by snagu View Post
    Sure, I understand that. I just don't see the point of "preserving" obviously faulty information. Far better to create a new torrent. For other sites that expire inactive torrents, you're going to be creating a new torrent in the future when it's time to re-seed anyway. And provided you don't add metadata to the audio files, anyone joining in to help you seed will be able to contribute 99% or so of the content anyway, so it's not a big deal to correct misinformation for the benefit of the future audience.

    To be clear, I don't modify even the info while I'm still helping seed an active torrent. This is all about when it gets posted the next time around. Particularly on other sites that don't specialise around one band where everyone knows all the set lists. And on those sites you do get torrents where the poster has no idea of the actual setlist, and others more familiar can help out.
    Agreed! I am just pointing out some facts in my previous notes so someone who is less familiar with torrenting (maybe a newbie) is not under the impression that one can change the content of a seeding torrent without the consequence of causing a problem with downloads from the original post. But for the purposes of re-posting, correcting or adding (accurate) information is an added value.
    Floyd First Since 1978

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 44 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Thanks for your answers.

    Bottom line is, as with all things digital, backup your data (and, may I add, don't praise your backup until you've successfully restored things out of it), keep it safe. And if you're inclined, do whatever you want with your private copy.

    Simple!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    71
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I see the comment about physical media failing but remember that hard drives are also not exactly 100% safe either. I'm going through my archives now, finally, after over 20 years of dumping things on hard drives in some sort of vague order which resulted in one (very) big untidy mess! 20 years later, I have a pile of broken hard drives in front of me (luckily, in almost each case, the drives were duplicated so I haven't lost everything, but it could have been a lot worse if I hadn't made a second backup)

    2x 3.5" external 1.5tb WDElements - seems to be the controller mechanism (I hope!) so I'm optimistic I may be able to salvage them (one of them has unique data I did not back up) Both the same brand/box - both broken.

    1x 2TB external 2.5"... the last time I ever buy a small dinky 2TB drive (I'll stick to 3.5") - this one was practically brand new. Plugged it in "click, click, click..." - lost all the data - again, this wasn't backed up either although I managed to pull some stuff from it before it went completely kaput. Just like the previous two - this was hardly ever used. Less than 50 hours, which is nothing for a hard drive.


    Another 4 hard drives (2 internal) (2 external) all just for archiving purposes - different sizes (200gb/500gb/1TB/1.5TB) - all dead - all hardly ever used - again, less than 50 hours of usage. (as an example for comparison, my drive D in my PC has had over 12,000 hours of use, and works like a charm/still healthy)

    That's what broke on me over 20 years. I'm just glad I tended to make backups (and multiple backups) over time. But hard drives are not as reliable as you might think. I'm genuinely surprised at how many have stopped working after hardly any use at all (all of the above) It's only now I realise just how fallible they really are. I'm surprised - and upset because although I did backup most stuff, I think I've lost about a years worth of home videos/photos which I'll never get back again.

    I 100% recommend a tiny program called 'Crystal Disk' - it's completely free and it will tell you what state your hard drive is in - including how many hours it's been used, error rate, temperature, etc. If I'd known about it before I would have (possibly) been able to spot the faulty drives much earlier. It's already helped me spot a hard drive that seems to run fine - but is actually running way, way, too hot (60 degrees) and i need to replace it pronto! I wouldn't have noticed unless I ran that program.

    Another thing is to try different drives in different pc's - what may not work on one pc may just load on another one (in which case, grab the data and chuck the drive) Also make sure the USB cable isn't faulty - change them around and experiment. Same with PSU's. I've found 2 faulty USB leads recently - I'm sure one of these leads broke one of the 1.5tb WDElements - as it kept turning on/off at 100mph and must have blown the chips on the controller mechanism.

    The bottom line? If it really means a lot to you - always make a backup of your backup. Then worry about how you rename things after
    Last edited by montymole; 2021-04-30 at 01:15 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •