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Thread: Creating a Matrix on Linux

  1. #1
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    Default Creating a Matrix on Linux

    Hey Gang,

    I'm really, really intrigued by the thought of creating my own Matrix mixes. I've fooled with it a few times, but I always get hung up and give up. This time I really would like to see it through.

    I am on Linux (can't stand Windows or Apple) and have been for over 20 years. So my SW choices are a little different. I'm most comfortable in Audacity for a DAW. I tried to install Reaper, but couldn't get it running on Linux Mint. If another OS (different Linux or whatever), I can probably get it up and running in a VM, if that would suffice. But I'd really rather just stay native if possible.

    I found these 2 links with some information, but they just don't seem to be getting me over the hump:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/audioengine...nce_recording/

    http://taperssection.com/index.php?t...822#msg1373822

    So, here's my plea to this incredible community... can someone please help me get going? I've already earmarked several shows that I'd like to start with, and I have the FLACs downloaded and sitting in a "Working" directory.

    Thanks to all of you and as always, I'm blown away by you guys!
    Off surfing with Linda, of course!

  2. #2
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    Default

    Maybe looking out a few shows is a bit ambitious! Start with one track from one show. Find a track that starts with a bang. Literally! Money from DSOTM would be a good shout. Look at what the opening 'kerching' looks like when you study the waveform in Audacity, then bring in your second track and try and match up the 'kerching' from that. Skip to a minute into the track and find a prominent drum hit that will give a nice clear waveform on both tracks. Try and adjust the time of the second track to match the first, or adjust whichever you think might be running too fast or slow. Occasionally a track might have a skip in it, so keep an eye on how things run for the next minute, etc.

    This is how I made my matrixes of the single and acetate versions of See Emily Play, a few tracks from Piper in mono and out-of-phase mixed to another mono track, etc. Tedious stuff really.

    Then consider which track might sit in the stereo field. Consider if one track has a radially different sonic profile to the other. Is one bassy and muffled and the other treble heavy and lacking bass frequencies? Is the best option to stick both in the center of the stereo field to try and produce a fortified mono recording with a fuller sound, or try and create something more lush to listen to with headphones?

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thank you for the advice. I will try to go a little slower. I think part of the problem with my most recent try was I was working on Raving & Drooling, and it doesn't have many reference points... at least at the beginning.
    Off surfing with Linda, of course!

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